[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.238.190.122. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 26, 1927

THE PLACE OF PREVENTIVE MEDICINE IN THE MEDICAL SCHOOL

Author Affiliations

Professor of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Vanderbilt University Medical Department NASHVILLE, TENN.

JAMA. 1927;88(13):973-977. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02680390001001
Abstract

It has almost become a truism that during the last two decades the standards of medical education have been tremendously improved and the endowments of schools of medicine enormously increased. The amazing advancement in the methods of training the undergraduate student in medicine easily surpasses that of any other phase of educational endeavor. This means that better equipment is provided for laboratory teaching, that the personnel of medical faculties has been enlarged and as a whole improved in quality, and that more adequate and superior hospital facilities have been provided for clinical instruction. It is, however, manifest that insufficient emphasis has been placed on teaching the prevention and control of disease. Moreover, it has become increasingly evident to leaders of medical thought that the preventive aspects of medicine have not been sufficiently stressed in the medical curriculum as a whole, and I think it is also generally agreed that if

×