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Article
March 26, 1927

AMEBIC DYSENTERY IN CHICAGO: PRELIMINARY REPORT OF A SURVEY OF FOOD HANDLERS FOLLOWING A SMALL OUTBREAK

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine, and the Department of Health, City of Chicago.

JAMA. 1927;88(13):977-980. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02680390005002
Abstract

Since the literature on intestinal protozoa and worms has been reviewed very carefully by Boeck and Stiles,1 Wenyon and O'Connor,2 and Dobell,3 it will be sufficient for us to state briefly the works of other writers.

The general impression among many medical men is that amebic dysentery is a strictly tropical disease. That it is endemic in many tropical and subtropical regions is true, but it is not by any means limited to those regions. The first case of amebic dysentery was discovered by Loesch in 1875, in the stools of a patient suffering from dysentery in Russia. This discovery initiated the attention of a large number of workers, lasting for some forty years. The point at issue was whether the intestinal amebas of man do or do not cause dysentery. The reasons for the dispute were twofold: (1) they failed to realize that the amebas constitute

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