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Article
March 26, 1927

ABSORPTION OF CALCIUM FROM THE INTESTINAL TRACT OF HUMAN SUBJECTS: THE INFLUENCE OF FOODS

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.
From the Department of Biochemistry, George Washington University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1927;88(13):980-984. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02680390008003
Abstract

The literature on the therapeutic value of calcium salts contains many conflicting reports, and the results obtained in practice have also been somewhat discordant. This is probably due to a lack of knowledge of the principles governing the absorption of calcium from the alimentary tract.

Many investigators have reported relationships from metabolism experiments in which the fecal calcium and the urinary calcium were estimated after the ingestion of calcium salts under varying conditions. Much valuable information has been obtained from experiments of this kind, but an examination of the physiologic mechanism of the absorption and excretion of calcium shows that these procedures are not entirely applicable to the investigation of the absorption of calcium from the intestinal tract. Experimental work has shown that calcium absorption occurs in the small intestine and that calcium excretion occurs by two eliminatory channels, the large intestine and the kidneys. Absorbed calcium may be excreted

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