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Article
January 3, 1931

DEVELOPMENTS IN THE PROBLEM OF ARTHRITIS

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

JAMA. 1931;96(1):33-35. doi:10.1001/jama.1931.02720270035010
Abstract

Neglected for many years, the problem of arthritis has been kept alive in the medical mind largely through the solicitude of orthopedic surgeons. Itself the legitimate child of internal medicine, it has been reared by others acting as foster parents to it. Having come of age, arthritis is at last being recognized and gathered unto the bosom of the medical family.

It is a gratifying spectacle to those interested in the rheumatoid problem to see that it is taking its place as one of the great chapters of medicine, along with tuberculosis and syphilis. Ten years ago there were perhaps two or at most three clinics for the study of arthritis. Today there are such clinics in nearly every medical center and, in some cities, several. The reasons for this development have been pressure from the industrial world to reduce disability pensions, especially in Europe; the natural internal growth of

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