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Article
April 2, 1927

THE RELATION OF VITAMIN E TO IRON ASSIMILATION

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE
From the Department of Chemical Hygiene, School of Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University.

JAMA. 1927;88(14):1047-1050. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02680400003001
Abstract

In 1922-1923, Evans and Bishop1 reported a remarkable series of experiments relating to the failure of rats to give birth to young when fed a diet composed of casein, 18 Gm.; corn starch, 54 Gm.; butter fat, 9 Gm.; salts (185), 4 Gm.; lard, 15 Gm., and dry yeast, from 0.4 to 0.6 Gm. daily.

A detailed study of these females revealed the fact that they became pregnant, but invariably resorption of the young resulted. The males were not confined to this experimental diet, but were fed a satisfactory ration. Evans later reported that their experimental diet induced sterility in male rats.2 They demonstrated the remarkable effectiveness of wheat germ oil, among other things, in preventing the death and resorption of the young. It also protects the males against degeneration of the germinal epithelium. Through appropriate experiments, they eliminated the lack of vitamins A, B, C and D

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