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Article
November 18, 1933

THE SEX DETERMINATION TEST OF DORN AND SUGARMAN

Author Affiliations

BROOKLYN
From the Department of Pathology, New York University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College, and the Pathological Laboratories, St. John's Hospital.

JAMA. 1933;101(21):1630-1632. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740460032008
Abstract

This communication proposes to report certain experiments designed at determining the presence of a specific sex hormone in the urine of pregnant women. The experiments were undertaken in an attempt to repeat the work of Dorn and Sugarman,1 recently reported. These workers found that it was possible to predict correctly the sex of the unborn child in eighty out of eighty-five cases (94 per cent) following intravenous injection of the urine of pregnant women into immature male rabbits. Their predictions were based on the fact that the urine of women who bore female

children caused the testicles of the experimental animals to show enlargement and congestion as well as microscopic evidence of increased spermatogenesis. On the other hand, the urine of women who bore male children caused no such testicular change. In their article they infer that the accuracy of their results was enhanced by the use of animals

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