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Article
November 25, 1933

THE PRESENT STATUS OF IDIOPATHIC ULCERATIVE COLITIS: WITH ESPECIAL REFERENCE TO ETIOLOGY

Author Affiliations

Associate in Medicine, Johns Hopkins University; Gastro-Enterologist to the Diagnostic Clinic, and Assistant Visiting Physician of the Johns Hopkins Hospital BALTIMORE
From the Departments of Medicine, Gastro-Intestinal Clinic, and Pathology and Bacteriology of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Hospital.

JAMA. 1933;101(22):1687-1694. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740470001001
Abstract

Any involvement, regional or general, of the large intestine above the lower part of the rectum resulting in a sanguineous, a mucosanguineous, a mucopurulent or a mucopurulent-sanguineous exudate, with or without diarrhea, due to known or unknown factors, save that of a neoplasm, is a colitis. Clinically, the corollary follows that a colonic exudate or feces containing blood, mucoblood or pus, or all of them, is due to a colitis when neoplastic disease and perianal, perirectal and localized disturbances of the hemorrhoidal area are eliminated as causes.

This communication concerns itself with a form of colitis known as idiopathic. primary, nonspecific, ulcerative, chronic ulcerative, hemorrhagic or suppurative colitis, colitis gravis, ulcerosa or ulcereuse.

ETIOLOGIC CONSIDERATIONS 

General Prevalence.  —This syndrome is not restricted to age, sex, season or zone. The greatest number of cases fall within the second, third and fourth decades.

Epidemiology.  —Idiopathic ulcerative colitis possesses neither epidemic nor infective

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