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Article
November 25, 1933

ORIGINAL FEATURES OF ARTHROPLASTY OF THE HIP AND KNEE

Author Affiliations

Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Columbia University NEW YORK

JAMA. 1933;101(22):1694-1699. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740470008002
Abstract

With regard to the wisdom of mobilizing ankylosed hips, one finds considerable difference of opinion among the best of surgeons. Henderson, reviewing the end-results of arthroplasties of the jaw, elbow, knee and hip, found those for the hip the poorest. Murphy, on the other hand, found that the hip gave him the best results. The problem is obviously more complicated in weight-bearing joints. The occupation and social status of the patient, as well as his temperament, are often determining factors in deciding whether or not to operate. When the hip and knee on the same side are both ankylosed, the advantages of arthroplasty are much increased.

It must always be remembered that stability is very important in the hip, and, although the rotary nature of the joint lends itself to arthroplasty, unfortunate results have followed arthroplasty when stability was not obtained.

Arthroplasty in cases of tuberculosis should be approached with

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