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Article
April 9, 1927

TYPHOID IN THE LARGE CITIES OF THE UNITED STATES IN 1926: FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT

JAMA. 1927;88(15):1148-1150. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.92680410024010
Abstract

The Journal presents its fifteenth annual survey of typhoid fever mortality in the seventy-eight cities of the United States that had more than 100,000 population in 1926.1 As in the fourteenth report, the cities have been grouped according to the recognized divisions of the U. S. Census Bureau. One city (Jacksonville) appears for the first time in our tables.2

The cities of the New England group (table 1) make a remarkable showing, and one that would be creditable to any similar population group anywhere in the world. No less than seven of the twelve New England cities report typhoid death rates of less than 1 per hundred thousand of population. The total rate for the group (1.51) is the lowest for any geographic division in the United States (table 11). Two New England cities (New Bedford and Lowell) have had rates under 1 per hundred thousand of population for two

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