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Article
April 9, 1927

TYPHOID IN THE LARGE CITIES OF THE UNITED STATES

JAMA. 1927;88(15):1182. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02680410058014

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Abstract

The fifteenth annual survey of typhoid mortality, published elsewhere in this issue, bears testimony to the remarkable improvement in typhoid rates which has occurred in the large cities in this country since these summaries were first undertaken. Data are available throughout the whole period for fifty-nine cities, which in 1910 had a population of 21,125,340 and in 1926 an estimated population of 29,784,917. Despite this population increase of over eight million, the actual number of typhoid deaths fell from 4,143 in 1910 to 822 in 1926, and the rates per hundred thousand of population from 19.61 to 2.76. If the rate that prevailed in 1910 had been maintained in 1926, the number of typhoid deaths would have been 5,840, or more than 5,000 deaths in excess of the number actually recorded. Since a material reduction in typhoid case fatality rates has not occurred during this period, these figures mean that

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