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Article
April 16, 1927

VALUE OF SODIUM THIOSULPHATE IN POISONING FROM ORAL ADMINISTRATION OF ARSENIC

Author Affiliations

RICHMOND, VA.
From the Department of Pharmacology, Medical College of Virginia.

JAMA. 1927;88(16):1219-1220. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02680420009004
Abstract

A truly effective chemical antidote for a poison would possess definite advantages over gastric lavage as a therapeutic measure. Lavage can be practiced only by some one specially trained; one cannot hope by it to remove the portion of the poison that has passed into the intestine; and it is extremely disagreeable to the patient and requires considerable time for its performance. The enthusiastic statements regarding the efficiency of sodium thiosulphate as an antidote for various metallic poisons are therefore of great interest.

Though first suggested by Ravaut, 1 the employment of sodium thiosulphate as an antidote in this country has been due to the papers of Dennie and McBride.2 These authors state that sodium thiosulphate is "a highly efficient and rapid neutralizing agent for the common metallic poisons: arsenic, mercury, lead, and bismuth." Semon3 feels that it "may be found an indispensable adjunct in the treatment of

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