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Article
January 4, 1941

CARCINOMA OF THE STOMACH: WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO THE SIGNIFICANCE OF PERSISTENT SYMPTOMS ASCRIBED TO THE STOMACH AND THE MALIGNANT POTENTIALITY OF GASTRIC ULCERS

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Division of Surgery, the Mayo Clinic.

JAMA. 1941;116(1):22-25. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820010024005
Abstract

The seriousness of cancer of the stomach may be emphasized by consideration of the three major causes of death enumerated by Livingston and Pack1 in a study of end results in the treatment of gastric cancer. These authors have pointed out the fact that our nation has engaged in six major wars since 1776 which extended over a total period of fifteen years. In these fifteen years of war 244,357 American soldiers were killed in action or died of wounds received in action. During the fifteen years of peace, 1923 to 1937 inclusive, 441,912 persons died from injuries received on the highways of the United States. On the basis of 40,000 deaths a year from cancer of the stomach, as determined from figures furnished to Livingston and Pack by the American Society for the Control of Cancer, the total deaths in the United States from cancer of the stomach

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