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Article
January 4, 1941

A TYPE OF CHRONIC PERITONITIS APPARENTLY DUE TO INTESTINAL INFECTION

JAMA. 1941;116(1):43-45. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820010045011
Abstract

The peritoneum itself is very resistant to infection. In this it probably represents a bactericidal ability beyond any other tissue in the body. This bactericidal ability is especially marked with intestinal organisms, such as those of the coliform group. That the peritoneum is constantly assailed by bacteria is suggested by the work of Roberts, Johnson and Bruckner,1 in which it was shown that in 80 per cent of the instances, and irrespective of intraperitoneal inflammatory reaction, positive cultures were obtained. These differed from the bacteriology of the air and were of intestinal micro-organisms. In noninflammatory conditions a staphylococcus was recovered in 11.2 per cent. Ordinarily these organisms are cared for by the peritoneum, the lymph and vascular systems and the blood. While the ability of the peritoneum to destroy organisms is high, it apparently is not complete in that in 6 per cent of healthy persons on one vein

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