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Article
January 4, 1941

THE PHYSICIAN AND THE OFFICIAL INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE AGENCIES

JAMA. 1941;116(1):55-56. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820010057016
Abstract

A survey of activity in the field of industrial hygiene in the United States1 draws attention to the increase in the number of official consulting and investigative agencies in this field. State and federal governments as well as other agencies are expanding their programs. The range of medical activity in industrial health is so wide-spread and frequently of such special character as to require the services of physicians in many categories of public and private employment. Physicians in industry may be classified according to whether preventive or remedial services preponderate in their ordinary activities. At one extremity is the medically trained industrial hygienist, concerned mainly with the elimination of environmental and personal factors underlying lost time in industry. At the opposite end is the private physician in general or special practice, who is most frequently called by employers or insurance organizations to treat individual cases of compensable industrial disability.

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