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Article
April 30, 1927

THE TEACHING VALUE OF POSTGRADUATE CLINICS AND CLINICAL PROGRAMS

Author Affiliations

DES MOINES, IOWA

JAMA. 1927;88(18):1375-1377. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02680440009003
Abstract

The promotion of postgraduate medical study through the medium of clinics or clinical conferences, away from medical teaching institutes, is an expression of the missionary idea, and a form of the extension study course so generally adopted in other fields of educational work.

The purpose is to bring to the graduate in medicine who is in active practice the results of medical research and progress without necessitating attendance at some established graduate medical school.

The successful accomplishment of the educational purpose depends on several factors. Every physician should have the teaching instinct, but not every one is born to the art. Much of the teaching value derived from a clinical conference depends on the ability of the clinician to draw out of the subject or patient a comprehensive and instructive lesson. To educate—from educo—means to lead or draw out, not to stuff.

The teacher naturally appears at his best when

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