[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.226.244.70. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
December 16, 1933

UNUSUAL EXPERIENCE WITH AMEBIC DYSENTERY: IN AN AVERAGE HOSPITAL OF A NORTHERN STATE, WITH REPORT OF NINE CASES ORIGINATING IN CHICAGO

Author Affiliations

ST. PAUL
From the pathologic laboratory of the Charles T. Miller Hospital, Inc., and Amherst H. Wilder Dispensary, St. Paul, and the Department of Pathology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis.

JAMA. 1933;101(25):1944-1953. doi:10.1001/jama.1933.02740500024007
Abstract

The news of a serious outbreak of amebic dysentery in Chicago during the summer, contained in the press dispatch of Nov. 10, 1933, immediately confirmed the belief that all the five cases then presenting the disease, which had been recognized in this hospital during the preceding three weeks, had probably been contracted while the patients were visiting in that city. Not until the publication of the articles1 on amebiasis dealing specifically with this outbreak, in the November 18 issue of The Journal, was the seriousness of the situation with its widespread danger affecting the whole nation fully appreciated. While my associates and I did not, from the onset of our experience, minimize the far reaching epidemiologic significance of amebiasis as a result of the suspected outbreak in Chicago, we were more impressed with the comparatively large number of cases we had been able to recognize during this short period,

×