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Article
January 17, 1931

GASTRIC SYPHILIS: OBSERVATIONS BASED ON NINETY-THREE CASES

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Division of Medicine, the Mayo Clinic.

JAMA. 1931;96(3):173-179. doi:10.1001/jama.1931.02720290017005
Abstract

The traditional conception of late or tertiary lesions of acquired syphilis of the alimentary tract is confined almost entirely to those of the mouth, nasopharynx and rectum. Even less than a decade ago the late Clifford Allbutt,1 in a contribution to the subject of visceral syphilis, made the following statement: "Of the intestines: the mouth and throat, the oesophagus, the stomach and the bowels seem generally, in the acquired disease, to escape till we reach that common seat—the rectum." In the light of our present knowledge based on authentic pathologic and clinical investigations, we realize that the esophagus, stomach, small bowel, colon and rectum are only relatively immune, and with the possible exclusion of the esophagus, which seems rarely affected, it is still an unsettled question as to which organ of the gastro-intestinal tract is most frequently involved. Undoubtedly routinely made serologic and roentgenoscopic examination of patients with digestive

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