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Article
January 18, 1941

SHOULD CORONARY DISEASE AND HYPERTENSION BE A CAUSE FOR REJECTION IN INDUSTRY?

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO

JAMA. 1941;116(3):209-213. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820030031007
Abstract

The answer to the highly controversial question "Should coronary disease and hypertension be a cause for rejection in industry?" depends to a great extent on who is asked—the injured worker, the employer, the trade union, the insurance carrier or the industrial physician. These are the people primarily involved in the solution of one of the most frequent yet most complicated problems confronting the student of industrial medicine. I use the word "student" because I know of no other pathologic problem in this specialty requiring more careful study in each individual case if the problem is at all concerned with industrial liability.

High in morbidity and highest in mortality, heart disease is the most expensive illness. More than a fifth of cardiac disorders occurs in persons under the age of 40, and it costs this country $250,000,000 a year in lost wages, in addition to the cost of physical and financial

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