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Article
February 1, 1941

CEREBRAL SPASTIC PARALYSIS: THE OBSTETRIC HISTORY OF ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-FIVE CASES

Author Affiliations

INDIANAPOLIS
From the Departments of Obstetrics and Orthopedic Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1941;116(5):374-377. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820050018004
Abstract

This study of the obstetric history of 185 cases of cerebral spastic paralysis was undertaken without preconceived ideas as to the most important etiologic factors involved. Schreiber1 expressed the belief that apnea is the biggest single factor in the production of cerebral injury. He stated that analgesic drugs, given in greater amounts than the pharmacologic dosage, may, in many instances, be the causative factor of fetal anoxemia with resultant cerebral damage in the infant. Cole and his associates2 stated that prematurity is the most important factor in the etiology of neonatal asphyxia. Other well recognized factors are the normal forces of labor, oxytocics, operative intervention, nonintervention, postnatal infection and trauma in the baby. As the majority of cases of cerebral spastic palsy are associated with definite cerebral injury at birth, we thought it worth while to review the obstetric histories of a group of children with this disorder.

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