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Article
February 1, 1941

THE ROLE OF CHLORIDES IN ALKALOSIS: FOLLOWING THE ADMINISTRATION OF CALCIUM CARBONATE

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Medicine, University of Chicago.

JAMA. 1941;116(5):384-390. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820050028006
Abstract

The term "alkalosis" was used originally by Fischler1 in 1911 with reference to the toxemia of animals with Eck fistulas because the disturbance was attributed to a disproportion between the acid and base in the body. Alkalosis has since assumed increasing significance in relation to various experimental and clinical problems. It was first reported as a complication of the Sippy treatment of peptic ulcer by Grant2 in 1922, although Sippy himself had previously recognized its occurrence.3 Its manifestations have now become familiar to most clinicians as a result of the detailed accounts of Hardt and Rivers,4 Ellis,5 Gatewood and his associates6 and others.7 Despite the fact that the original Sippy powders were mixtures of sodium bicarbonate and calcium carbonate, the systemic effects of alkali administration were attributed entirely to the highly soluble sodium bicarbonate, and the influence of calcium carbonate on the electrolyte

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