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Article
February 8, 1941

THE BODY ECONOMY OF VITAMIN C IN HEALTH AND DISEASE: WITH SPECIAL STUDIES IN TUBERCULOSIS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Research Department of the City of Chicago Municipal Tuberculosis Sanitarium, Dr. Frederick Tice, president, Board of Directors (Dr. Sweany) and the Department of Physiology, University of Chicago, Dr. A. J. Carlson, chairman (Dr. Clancy, Dr. Radford and Miss Hunter).

JAMA. 1941;116(6):469-474. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820060017004
Abstract

During the past generation most of the diseases due to a deficiency of accessory food factors have been brought under control, and within the last decade many of the active principles concerned have yielded the secrets of their chemical structure. Not the least of these is the antiscorbutic substance, or "water soluble" vitamin C, a principle known to exist in limes and lemons for over a hundred years and recently found in abundance also in a large number of fruits and vegetables and in animal tissues.

As healing in tuberculosis is characterized largely by the formation of connective tissue, and the latter, according to Wolbach and his associates,1 is formed by the action of vitamin C on fibroblasts, it does not seem unreasonable to suspect that a vitamin C deficiency may be one of the causes of unfavorable trends in tuberculosis, if it does not actually contribute to exacerbations

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