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Article
March 1, 1941

ISOIMMUNIZATION IN PREGNANCY: ITS POSSIBLE BEARING ON THE ETIOLOGY OF ERYTHROBLASTOSIS FOETALIS

Author Affiliations

NEWARK, N. J.; ENGLEWOOD, N. J.
From the Division of Laboratories, Newark Beth Israel Hospital, Newark, N. J., and the Englewood Hospital, Englewood, N. J.

JAMA. 1941;116(9):825-827. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820090025006
Abstract

A number of transfusion accidents in pregnancy have been reported in the literature, even though the donor, frequently the husband, was in the same blood group as the patient.1 In one instance analyzed by Levine and Stetson2 it was assumed that the accident could be attributed to an agglutinin resulting from immunization of the mother by factors in the fetus inherited from the father.

Analysis of a series of 12 cases in which atypical agglutinins could be demonstrated revealed the significant fact that these patients presented obstetric histories characterized by a number of complications such as toxemia, macerated fetus, repeated abortions, miscarriages or stillbirths.3

Recently 5 additional patients with atypical agglutinins were observed, 3 of whom gave birth to infants suffering from erythroblastosis foetalis. The obstetric histories of these cases are so striking as to merit brief mention.

One patient, J. L. (decigravida, sextipara), now pregnant and

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