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Article
March 1, 1941

PARATYPHOID SEPTICEMIA IN MAN DUE TO SALMONELLA SUIPESTIFER

Author Affiliations

Field Epidemiologist; Director, Carter-Unicoi-Johnson Health District Nashville, Tenn.
From the Tennessee Department of Public Health.

JAMA. 1941;116(9):829-830. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.62820090003007a
Abstract

So far as is known, no case of septicemia due to Salmonella suipestifer has been reported previously in Tennessee. In 1927 Stewart and Litterer1 reported a milk-borne epidemic of gastroenteritis at Dyersburg, Tenn., caused by this organism. It would appear that "food poisoning" cases of S. suipestifer are more frequent than other manifestations due to this organism. However, during the past few years several cases of continued fever caused by this organism have been reported in the United States. In 1932, Kuttner and Zepp2 of the Johns Hopkins Hospital reported a series of 7 cases of S. suipestifer septicemia in children at Baltimore varying in age from 7 months to 6 years. Again in 1933 these authors3 described 4 similar cases in persons from 5 weeks to 28 years of age, one of whom died. Several authors in this country and abroad have reported isolated cases of

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