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Article
June 11, 1927

ENDEMIC MENINGOCOCCUS MENINGITIS: THE QUANTITATIVE SUGAR AND CHLORIDE CONTENT OF THE CEREBROSPINAL FLUID DURING SPECIFIC SERUM THERAPY

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Diseases of Children, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University and the Chemical Laboratory, Babies' Hospital.

JAMA. 1927;88(24):1859-1865. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02680500001001
Abstract

Numerous investigators1 agree that the sugar content of the cerebrospinal fluid is commonly decreased in acute purulent meningococcus meningitis. Others have reported a decrease in the chlorides2 of the cerebrospinal fluid in the same disease. There is little record in the literature3 of the quantitative changes in these constituents of the cerebrospinal fluid during specific serum therapy. The subject of this report is the quantitative changes in the sugar and chloride content of the cerebrospinal fluid in thirty-three cases of sporadic meningococcus meningitis in infants and children during the subarachnoid administration of antimeningococcus serum.

The normal cerebrospinal fluid sugar content, as determined by us with the Myers-Bailey4 modification of the Lewis Benedict method, varies between 45 and 65 mg. per hundred cubic centimers. The normal cerebrospinal fluid chloride content, as determined by us with the method of Myers and Short5 varies between 675 and 750

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