[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 8, 1941

HANS ZINSSER AND HIS STUDIES ON TYPHUS FEVER

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Laboratories of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research.

JAMA. 1941;116(10):907-912. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820100001001
Abstract

All science and philosophy and every form of human speech is about objects capable of being perceived by the speaker and the hearer;... when our thought pretends to deal with the Subject it is really only dealing with an Object under a false name. The only proposition about the Subject, namely, "I am," cannot be used in the same sense by any two of us, and, therefore, it can never become science at all.—James Clerk Maxwell.1

I. INTRODUCTION  At this time the recent tragic death of Zinsser should make us pause: to count our great loss; to pay our respects and esteem to his memory, and to recall his great and many contributions to science and, this evening, to the knowledge of typhus fever. Although I also at one time labored in this field, I am keenly aware of my deficiencies in trying to set forth an appraisal of

×