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Article
March 8, 1941

PELLAGRA AND THE PUBLIC HEALTH: A DIETARY SURVEY OF KENTUCKY MOUNTAIN FOLK IN PELLAGROUS AND IN NONPELLAGROUS COMMUNITIES

Author Affiliations

HYDEN, KY.; CINCINNATI
From the Department of Internal Medicine, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, and the Frontier Nursing Service, Inc., Wendover, Ky.

JAMA. 1941;116(10):912-915. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820100006002
Abstract

Certain facts about pellagra are now clearly established. There is no longer any doubt as to the fact of cure and none about the method. As far as each person with the disease is concerned, the cause is faulty diet; cure is accomplished by correcting the diet or by the use of nicotinic acid in addition to diet.1

Simple as these procedures may be, there continues to be a considerable amount of pellagra in certain regions, either because of the relapse of former patients or because of the appearance of new ones. The addition of small amounts of nicotinic acid to an unimproved diet has not been found to restore complete health. Where the most extensive trials have been made with nicotinic acid, physicians are unwilling to rely on this alone because of the appearance of other deficiencies, viz., beriberi and riboflavin deficiency.2

The complete eradication of pellagra

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