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Article
June 11, 1927

HYPOTENSION: REPORT OF SIX CASES IN ONE FAMILY

Author Affiliations

PITTSBURGH

JAMA. 1927;88(24):1875-1876. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02680500017007
Abstract

Comparatively few have been the communications in various journals on the subject of low blood pressure. As opposed to hypertension, it pales into insignificance in the niche which it occupies in medical literature. At first thought, and from an academic standpoint, this may seem lamentable. But viewed from the clinician's point of vantage, should the condition—with the extreme paucity of stigmas ascribable to the hypotension per se— command a major claim on the profession's attention? That it assumes increased significance when associated with debilitating and even fatal diseases, such as arthritis, tuberculosis and Addison's disease, is, of course, obvious. Such associations are excluded from the discussion presented here, and I speak only of that hypotension unassociated with any determinable pathologic condition: that type which may be termed "essential" or "incidental" hypotension.

With many of those who have commented on the matter of low blood pressure in recent years, the opinion

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