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Article
June 11, 1927

THE DETECTION AND INCIDENCE OF HUMAN INTESTINAL PROTOZOA BY THE SIGMOIDOSCOPE

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE
From the Department of Medicine, Gastro-Intestinal Clinic, Johns Hopkins Hospital and Medical School, and the Department of Medical Zoology, School of Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University.

JAMA. 1927;88(24):1876-1879. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02680500018008
Abstract

Although Manson-Bahr1 has advocated the use of the sigmoidoscope in the detection of low sigmoid and upper rectal amebic ulcers, it is not apparent from the available literature that sigmoidoscopy has been used as a routine diagnostic measure to determine the presence of the intestinal protozoa in general. It is our purpose in this report to compare the incidence of protozoan parasites of the human intestine from specimens of feces obtained by the use of the sigmoidoscope with the usual defecated specimens submitted for examination. Similar procedure is being employed in the estimation and study of the bacterial flora of the large bowel.

This work was undertaken at the suggestion of Dr. Thomas R. Brown, associate professor of clinical medicine and chief of the gastro-intestinal clinic.

MATERIALS AND METHODS  The types of persons examined were extremely varied. A group of nationalities was represented which appeared at the clinic for

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