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Article
June 11, 1927

A HARMLESS MUCOUS MEMBRANE IRRIGANT

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI; COVINGTON, KY.
From the Eichberg Physiological Laboratory, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine.

JAMA. 1927;88(24):1881-1882. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02680500023010
Abstract

During the last several years the nose and throat surgeons have given up increasingly the use of irrigating solutions in the treatment of acute or chronically inflamed accessory sinuses or after these have been operated on. The feeling seems to be general that their employment is harmful, and it is frequently maintained that they spread infection. The saturated boric acid solution or the so-called physiologic salt solutions commonly used in hospitals (solutions of sodium chloride, varying in concentration from 0.7 per cent to 0.85 per cent) at times unquestionably produce such bad effects, and yet, it must appeal to every one's surgical sense that the mechanical cleansing of mucous membranes, coated with mucus or pus, can by itself be only of benefit.

In reviewing the matter some two years ago, we were of the opinion that the evil effects produced by such irrigants were dependent on their faulty composition. As

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