[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.204.168.209. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 8, 1941

LEGAL RESPONSIBILITY FOR MEDICAL MALPRACTICE: I. THE LEGAL MATRIX OF MEDICAL MALPRACTICE

Author Affiliations

Member of the Bar of the United States Supreme Court BOSTON

JAMA. 1941;116(10):942-947. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.62820100002009
Abstract

FOREWORD  Within the last thirty years the practice of medicine has become an enormously more complex undertaking, and during that period the increase in legal problems relating to medical practice has tended to parallel the general enlargement of the field. Prior to 1910, the patient-physician relationship was a relatively simple one. Since then, the legal aspects of this relationship have been complicated by many changes, including the practice of dividing the responsibility for the diagnosis or the care of patients with other physicians, with technicians or with nurses; the advent of group practice, of health insurance and of contract practice; the growing number of circumstances in which the physician examines but does not treat, as in the examination of insured persons, of employees, of school children, of claimants of pensions, of claimants of damages for personal injury and of persons accused of crimes; the increase in the number of physicians

×