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Article
June 18, 1927

ANTISCORBUTIC VITAMIN CONTENT OF MILK OF STALL-FED COWS THROUGHOUT A YEAR: PROBABILITY THAT ENSILAGE IS AN IMPORTANT SOURCE OF THIS VITAMIN

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Chemistry, Columbia University.

JAMA. 1927;88(25):1947-1949. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02680510005002
Abstract

Milk from cows which are stall-fed the year round is being used to some extent at the present time in the feeding of infants. In view of the fact that the milk from pasture-fed animals has been reported by most investigators to be richer in its vitamin content than that from animals without access to pasture, it has seemed of interest to test the milk from a herd of stall-fed cows for an entire year to determine its antiscorbutic potency. The greater antiscorbutic value of the milk of the pasture-fed cow is doubtless due to the antiscorbutic vitamin content of the fresh grasses which the animal receives, since the animal body probably does not synthesize this vitamin and is therefore dependent on its food to provide an adequate amount of it in its milk. Ensilage being the principal source of the antiscorbutic vitamin in the ration of the stall-fed cows,

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