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Article
March 22, 1941

SPONTANEOUS LUXATION OF THE EYEBALL: REPORT OF AN INSTANCE IN A BRACHYCEPHALIC PATIENT

Author Affiliations

BUFFALO
From the wards of the Children's Hospital.

JAMA. 1941;116(12):1206-1208. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820120020006
Abstract

There is little to be found in ordinary textbooks on ophthalmology on the subject of spontaneous luxation of the eyeball. Some confusion has resulted because of the use of the synonymous terms "dislocation" and "luxation." The word "avulsion," while in no sense a synonym of these two words, when applied to the eyeball does describe a condition which may result from the same type of injury that can cause luxation. Berens1 mentioned luxation as being due to injury. Fuchs2 and others mentioned instances of luxation of the eye which occurs traumatically in certain barbarous tribes in which gouging of the eyes in fights and brawls is practiced. A cow horn injury has been known to luxate a human eyeball, the horn acting as a lever and the orbital margin as a fulcrum. One old report (DeWecker, cited by Parsons3) was of a pugilist who snatched his eye

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