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Article
June 25, 1927

NONVENEREAL (METASTATIC) GENITAL INFECTION

Author Affiliations

PITTSBURGH

JAMA. 1927;88(26):2025-2028. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02680520015007
Abstract

In a recent paper I1 presented data showing that nonvenereal infection constituted about 20 per cent of all genital infections, and that focal infection in remote parts was a most important etiologic factor. These conclusions were based on careful clinical and bacteriologic study of sixty-seven cases of undoubted nonvenereal prostatitis; further observation of the same nature has confirmed, in my mind, these conclusions.

The term "metastatic" has been used in describing these cases to indicate that the infection is blood or lymph borne in contradistinction to direct infection by way of the normal communicating paths, such as ascending (from the urethra) and descending (from the kidney).

A brief abstract of a few typical cases will illustrate the etiology and nature of this form of genital infection.

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.  —L., a man, aged 30, eleven days following a furuncle on the neck, developed an acute pain in

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