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Article
June 25, 1927

RELATION OF CALCIUM AND BILIRUBINEMIA TO INTOXICATION WITH CARBON TETRACHLORIDE

JAMA. 1927;88(26):2036. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02680520026012
Abstract

The extensive employment of carbon tetrachloride in the treatment of persons harboring the hookworm has made it imperative to give careful consideration to the behavior of the anthelmintic substance itself in the body of the host. Tests made on experimental animals have revealed some discrepancies that were difficult to account for. In some groups of individuals enormous doses of the tetrachloride were tolerated, while others showed a considerable rate of morbidity and even of mortality as the result of a far smaller intake of the drug. These seemingly inexplicable variations appear likely now to be accounted for by the studies of Minot1 on behalf of the International Health Board at the Vanderbilt University Medical School, Nashville, Tenn. The most consistent change found in dogs after the oral administration of carbon tetrachloride was a marked increase in the concentration of bilirubin in the blood as shown by determination of the

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