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Article
July 2, 1927

ACUTE CARDIAC DILATATION: AN EVER PRESENT DANGER IN INTRAVENOUS INJECTIONS

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the laboratory of the Samaritan Hospital.

JAMA. 1927;89(1):21-22. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02690010021007
Abstract

A comparatively few years ago, the injection of drugs into the circulation was considered a somewhat dangerous practice and as a daily procedure was viewed as radical therapy. Today, however, it has become a well recognized therapeutic method of administering drugs, and almost everything in the Pharmacopeia is prepared in ampule form for intravenous use. The procedure is not, however, unattended with danger. Even simple intravenous injections of supposedly innocuous physiologic sodium chloride solution or dextrose in saline solution may prove disastrous, if the cardiac condition of the patient is considered of secondary importance to the accepted intravenous therapy or his general condition. The practice has become so prevalent that intravenous injections of saline or dextrose solution are employed, almost as a routine measure, even in the presence of a failing myocardium, when the patient's general condition appears to be failing or he is in need of fluid which cannot

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