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Article
April 12, 1941

ELECTRIC ARC WELDING: THE EFFECTS OF WELDING GASES AND FUMES

Author Affiliations

DETROIT
From the Chrysler Industrial Hygiene Laboratories (Drs. Meek and Harrold) and the Industrial Health Conservancy Laboratories (Dr. McCord).

JAMA. 1941;116(15):1618-1621. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820150008003
Abstract

In the fabrication of heavier metal products, welding already has extensively replaced bolts and rivets. Automobiles, trucks, ships, tanks, refrigerators, bridges and road machinery are representative of products now manufactured with welding as the chief means for uniting metallic parts. Although scores of special terms designate particular varieties of welding, nearly all may be grouped under three categories, namely resistance (spot) welding, gas welding (chiefly oxyacetylene) and arc welding.

Electric resistance welding briefly may be described as instantaneous electric spot heating and fusing under pressure. This form of welding is almost entirely free from prospective injury to workmen from any produced gases or rays. Minor injury from flying sparks is a possibility, and occasionally cutaneous irritants are present in or are produced by oil that previously may have been coating the metal parts subjected to spot welding.

Gas welding is a more dangerous procedure, particularly when carried out in unvented,

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