[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 19, 1941

CHANGES IN SERUM PROTEIN AND HEMOCONCENTRATION IN MAN: FOLLOWING TRANSFUSION OF A SOLUTION OF DRIED BLOOD PLASMA

Author Affiliations

Fellow in Surgery, Mayo Foundation; ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Division of Biochemistry (Dr. Osterberg), the Division of Surgery (Dr. Priestley) and the Section on Anesthesia (Dr. Seldon), the Mayo Clinic.

JAMA. 1941;116(16):1760-1762. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820160012003
Abstract

Many authors have shown recently that blood plasma approaches the ideal perfusion medium to be used in combating hemoconcentration and restoring an effective blood volume in the treatment of peripheral circulatory failure occurring in traumatic shock, in severe burns and after hemorrhage.1 The importance of proper methods for preserving plasma until needed for transfusion is obvious. The preservation of plasma by refrigeration or the addition of chemical preservatives has been attended with gratifying results.2 However, there are certain advantages to be obtained by removing the water and storing the plasma as a dry residue. The dangers of contamination or loss during storage and transit are considerably less under such circumstances. There is evidence that the dried residue represents the most stable form.3 Furthermore, it is possible to prepare concentrated hypertonic plasma or more dilute solutions as the need may be.

Recently a simple method for the preparation

×