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Article
April 19, 1941

ANTEPARTUM USE OF VITAMIN K: IN THE PREVENTION OF PROTHROMBIN DEFICIENCY IN THE NEWBORN

Author Affiliations

OMAHA
From the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Nebraska College of Medicine.

JAMA. 1941;116(16):1763-1766. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820160015004
Abstract

In an effort to evaluate the efficacy of vitamin K in the prevention of transient prothrombin deficiency in newborn infants and in the possible prevention of intracranial hemorrhage and hemorrhagic disease of the newborn, we report a study of 50 infants whose mothers were treated with vitamin K prior to delivery. The product used was 4-amino-2-methyl-1-naphthol hydrochloride, a synthetic preparation having vitamin K activity, 1 mg. per cubic centimeter,1 administered parenterally.

Dam and his associates2 reported that in normal children avitaminosis K, usually moderate, develops in the first days after birth and disappears after a week. Nygaard3 stated that a normal prothrombin time is maintained during the first ten hours after delivery but that definite reduction of the prothrombin content becomes apparent during the second half of the first day. This low level is continued during the following five days. From the sixth day prothrombin returns to

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