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Article
May 10, 1941

THE ETIOLOGIC ROLE OF CHEWING TOBACCO IN CANCER OF THE MOUTHREPORT OF EIGHT CASES TREATED WITH RADIATION

JAMA. 1941;116(19):2130-2135. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820190006002
Abstract

It is our purpose in this paper to discuss the etiologic relationship between tobacco chewing and cancer of the mouth and to report 8 cases in which irradiation was employed. The chewing of tobacco is by no means infrequent and the paucity of reports in the literature does not reflect the incidence or importance of this practice in cancer of the mouth. The eight cases included in this communication serve to illustrate the prominent features of what appears to be a clearly defined clinical entity.1

The observation that cancer of the oral cavity is considerably higher in males than in females has aroused much speculation and has stimulated investigation of the irritating effects of tobacco, to which men are exposed in a greater degree.2 A comprehensive survey of the literature led Lickint3 to conclude without reservation that the use of tobacco is a definite carcinogenic factor. Hoffman

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