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Article
July 30, 1927

THE FUNDAMENTALS AND THE CLINICAL ASPECTS OF LIGHT TREATMENT: WITH ESPECIAL RELATION TO TUBERCULOSIS

Author Affiliations

SARANAC LAKE, N. Y.

JAMA. 1927;89(5):361-367. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02690050027010
Abstract

Recent medical literature discloses steadily increasing possibilities for light therapy. Rickets and tetany under its influence show increased phosphorus and calcium of the blood, while calcium deposition takes place in the epiphyses of the long bones. Clinically in tetany, the disappearance of such symptoms as carpopedal spasms, laryngeal spasms and convulsions frequently takes place after exposures to quartz mercury vapor arc and carbon arc irradiations. Lupus vulgaris has healed in a large percentage of cases after exposures to ultraviolet rays from various sources. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis in many forms yields to treatment with artificial light as well as with sunlight radiations. These results have been so clear cut in a large number of cases that a knowledge of light and its clinical applications is fast becoming important to the practitioner of medicine.

Sunlight and air therapy owe their impetus particularly to the work of Bernhard at St. Moritz and Rollier at

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