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Article
August 6, 1927

HYPOPITUITARISM: A SUMMARY OF OBSERVATIONS IN TWENTY-SEVEN CASES FOLLOWED SEVEN YEARS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Endocrine Clinic, Department of Medicine, New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital.

JAMA. 1927;89(6):449. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02690060029010

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Abstract

Since 1919 there have been under our observation twenty-seven cases of hypopituitarism. The patients have reported consistently, so that their condition and progress have been most carefully followed. At the outset we laid down the following requisites before a case was included in this group:

  1. Stunting of growth.

  2. Decrease in sexual characteristics; e. g., infantile penis, infantile uterus, lack of characteristic hair lines and distribution, amenorrhea, and absence of sex instincts.

  3. Increased sugar tolerance, varying from a slight deviation from the normal to a plateau curve, and clinically occasionally expressed as a desire for "sweets."

  4. Obesity—variable, but most typically of the girdle type.

  5. Decrease in basal metabolic rate, though this was not considered essential.

  6. Other manifestations, as tapering fingers, low blood pressure, drowsiness, diabetes insipidus syndrome, headaches, and roenten-ray changes in the sella turcica.

Needless to say, few patients presented the entire deficiency syndrome, with all the classic signs, but

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