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Article
August 13, 1927

THE CONTROL OF HYPERTHYROIDISM BY THYROIDECTOMY: RESULTS IN ONE HUNDRED CASES

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Northwestern University Medical School.

JAMA. 1927;89(7):519-522. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02690070029011
Abstract

Diversity of opinion exists as to the value of thyroidectomy for the control of severe hyperthyroidism. There is confusion as to the risk encountered, the objective to be attained, and the final results that may be expected. In my experience bed rest, drugs and radiotherapy have proved inadequate and uncertain as compared with thyroidectomy, particularly since the more extensive removal of the gland has become customary. The almost uniformly beneficial results obtained by means of the resection of all but a small portion of the thyroid tissue are in marked contrast to the indifferent or poor results formerly observed with other measures, including less radical surgical attack. It is a matter of surprise, therefore, to find that other experienced clinicians fail to get similar satisfactory results from surgery and question the permanence of control. One does not contemplate the removal of such a large portion of so important an organ

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