[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Editorial
February 23, 2016

New Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock: Continuing Evolution but With Much Still to Be Done

Author Affiliations
  • 1Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston Salem, North Carolina
JAMA. 2016;315(8):757-759. doi:10.1001/jama.2016.0290

The diagnosis of sepsis is not a new concern. Indeed, as early as 700 bce, the Greeks recognized Σήψις (sepsis), referring to decomposition or rot, as a life-threatening condition associated with infection and high risk of death. The primary criterion for sepsis has historically been progressive organ system dysfunction resulting from infection. Because the only available therapies for this condition, antimicrobials and supportive care, are not specific, there was little concern about developing more detailed standards for diagnosis.

Limit 200 characters
Limit 25 characters
Conflicts of Interest Disclosure

Identify all potential conflicts of interest that might be relevant to your comment.

Conflicts of interest comprise financial interests, activities, and relationships within the past 3 years including but not limited to employment, affiliation, grants or funding, consultancies, honoraria or payment, speaker's bureaus, stock ownership or options, expert testimony, royalties, donation of medical equipment, or patents planned, pending, or issued.

Err on the side of full disclosure.

If you have no conflicts of interest, check "No potential conflicts of interest" in the box below. The information will be posted with your response.

Not all submitted comments are published. Please see our commenting policy for details.

Limit 140 characters
Limit 3600 characters or approximately 600 words
    ×