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Article
August 20, 1927

PRECEPTORSHIPS: AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE MEDICAL CURRICULUM OF THE PAST FOR WHICH NOTHING HAS BEEN SUBSTITUTED IN THE CURRICULUM OF MODERN MEDICAL SCHOOLS

Author Affiliations

Associate in Medicine, Northwestern University Medical School CHICAGO

JAMA. 1927;89(8):578-579. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02690080010005

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Abstract

One hundred years ago, those wishing to become doctors of medicine worked for from two to three years under a preceptor except for the time spent in attending two sessions of a medical school; each session was of four months' duration and consisted in courses of lectures which were repeated year after year. There were no requirements for admission to medical schools and no laboratory courses. A graduation thesis was prepared and the student received his M.D. degree, which then constituted a license to practice medicine in all its branches.

Today from two to four years of college are required for admission to the medical schools, where the student must spend four or five years. The courses of the first two years are so graded that the student is well grounded in the fundamental sciences before undertaking the clinical work in the third and fourth years and an internship in

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