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Article
June 21, 1941

ROENTGENOGRAPHIC DIAGNOSIS OF CONGENITAL SYPHILIS: IN UNERUPTED PERMANENT TEETH

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Histology, College of Dentistry, University of Illinois (Drs. Sarnat and Schour) and the Dental Division, Children's Memorial Hospital (Dr. Heupel).

JAMA. 1941;116(25):2745-2747. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820250011003
Abstract

This report demonstrates the value of routine intraoral roentgenograms of unerupted permanent teeth as an aid in the early diagnosis of congenital syphilis.

The growing teeth, like the bones and other organs, may be affected in congenital syphilis. Hutchinson1 described the screwdriver-shaped and notched permanent upper central incisors as the most common and characteristic clinical dental abnormality. A roentgenographic diagnosis of unerupted Hutchinson incisors was made first by Stokes and Gardner2 in a patient aged 5 years and subsequently by Meyer-Buley3 in a patient aged 2 years. Quinlan4 and others5 have reported similar diagnoses. While Moon6 described a characteristic clinical appearance in the permanent first molars, roentgenograms of these teeth prior to eruption have been reported by Pincherle.6a

REPORT OF CASE 

History.—  J. W., a Negro girl, born Jan. 8, 1934, apparently had bronchopneumonia during infancy and possibly rickets. A diagnosis of congenital

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