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Article
August 20, 1927

COEXISTING TYPHOID AND MALARIA: A RECONSIDERATION, WITH REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Medical Division of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.

JAMA. 1927;89(8):596-598. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02690080028011
Abstract

William Osler furnished a stimulus to the recording of instances of typhoid and malaria coexistent in the same patient in his attempt to have cast out from medical literature and from the minds of the profession the conception of a hybrid disease, typhomalarial fever. The hybrid, supposed to be a clinical entity, but without any bacteriologic or pathologic background, was introduced by Woodward, a Civil War army surgeon, in 1862. It was subsequently written on some fifty thousand sick-leaves, etc., of white troops, and from these got into local health reports and into several standard textbooks of medicine. To this day, in spite of repeated proofs of the nonexistence of the hybrid, it is used as a diagnosis by physicians in many parts of the country.

During the period of intensive study of malaria and typhoid, centering in Baltimore in the two decades following Laveran's discovery of the plasmodium, the

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