[Skip to Navigation]
Article
April 21, 1934

AN ANTIDOTE FOR ACUTE MERCURY POISONING: PRELIMINARY REPORT

Author Affiliations

Senior Pharmacologist, National Institute of Health, U. S. Public Health Service WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1934;102(16):1273-1276. doi:10.1001/jama.1934.02750160007002
Abstract

In experimental work recently reported,1 sodium formaldehyde sulphoxylate has been found to afford a high degree of protection to dogs who have previously received a fatal dose of corrosive mercuric chloride by mouth. A short account of this work with the methods of study and the technic of therapy, which I have tentatively adopted for human cases, is herein given so that it may be made available for clinical use at an early date.

Several compounds were tested for their ability to counteract the effect of corrosive mercuric chloride on excised tissues. This was done by studying the oxygen consumption of rat tissues in the Warburg-Barcroft microrespiration apparatus. The compounds that yielded promising results on oxygen consumption of tissues were then tested on rats and dogs for evidence of protective action against fatal doses of corrosive mercuric chloride.

A summary of results obtained in dogs with sulphoxylate therapy is

×