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Article
August 27, 1927

THE HEMATOPOIETIC EFFECTS OF INTRAVENOUSLY INJECTED NUCLEIC ACIDS: FURTHER OBSERVATIONS OF RESULTS IN NORMAL AND SPLENECTOMIZED RABBITS AND IN HUMAN PATIENTS

Author Affiliations

PORTLAND, ORE.
From the Departments of Anatomy and Medicine, University of Oregon Medical School.

JAMA. 1927;89(9):682-685. doi:10.1001/jama.1927.02690090032009
Abstract

Intravenous administration of the sodium salts of nucleic acids obtained from the blood cells of the fowl gave such interesting results on animals1 that it was thought justifiable to employ the method, with extreme caution, on human patients suffering from anemia. Accordingly, nucleic acids obtained by the Kessel-Neumann method, as previously described, were introduced intravenously in dosages of from 0.25 to 1 Gm., dissolved in physiologic sodium chloride solution, in a series of eleven patients. These patients were under hospital treatment and had been diagnosticated as secondary and pernicious anemia cases, with various associated complications. The smallest dose of sodium nucleate administered, 0.25 Gm., was approximately the same as had been given to rabbits weighing from 2.3 to 2.5 Kg., and the largest dose (one case) was four times this amount. There was therefore a great disparity between the body weights of the rabbits and of the patients treated

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