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Article
February 21, 1931

OBSTRUCTION OF THE POSTERIOR URETHRAL VALVE IN INFANCY AND CHILDHOOD: A STUDY OF EIGHTEEN CASES

Author Affiliations

Attending Urologist, Babies' Hospital and New York Nursery and Child's Hospital; Adjunct Urological Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital NEW YORK
From the Department of Urology, Pathology and the Children's Medical Division, Bellevue Hospital, Babies' Hospital and New York Nursery and Child's Hospital.

JAMA. 1931;96(8):592-597. doi:10.1001/jama.1931.02720340022006
Abstract

Urethral valves are the commonest congenital infravesical obstruction and, because they are confined to the prostatic canal, render the condition a male disease. Morphologically these valves may be mucosal ridges, folds, cusps or diaphragms. They are most often attached to the verumontanum and, when so involved, this organ is usually otherwise anomalous. When, by location or size, valves produce symptoms, the primary clinical manifestations are those of obstruction; secondary symptoms are those of uremia. The correct diagnosis is easily made by cysto-urethroscopy. Removal of the obstruction constitutes the treatment. The prognosis is directly proportional to the renal function. A study of eighteen cases of congenital posterior urethral valve obstruction is herewith presented; that all of these patients were children lends particular interest to this lesion.1

Although Langenbeck2 is generally accredited with the original description 128 years ago (1802), Young3 in 1913 was the first surgically to treat

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