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Article
July 12, 1941

STUDIES IN IMMUNITY TO PERTUSSIS: AN EVALUATION OF PERTUSSIS VACCINATION BY CLINICAL MEANS AND BY THE OPSONOCYTOPHAGIC TEST

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Sarah Morris Hospital for Children and the Nelson Morris Institute for Medical Research, Michael Reese Hospital.

JAMA. 1941;117(2):79-85. doi:10.1001/jama.1941.02820280001001
Abstract

There have been a number of surveys in recent literature concerned with the value of pertussis vaccination.1 Some of these have been mainly or entirely based on clinical statistics, whereas others have been laboratory studies. Clinically, immunity to pertussis is difficult to determine because children cannot purposely be exposed to the disease. In order to evaluate the efficacy of pertussis vaccination by clinical means a study extending over a period of years must be made, comparing the incidence of the disease in the vaccinated and the nonvaccinated control group under conditions as nearly similar as possible in regard to susceptibility and exposure. Excellent studies of this type have been done by Sauer,2 Kendrick and Eldering3 and Singer-Brooks.4 It is generally agreed, however, that with clinical surveys alone it is difficult to prove the efficacy of pertussis vaccination.

REVIEW OF CLINICAL LITERATURE  Most observers working from a

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